Word 2016 2013 2007 2003

How to review Tracked Changes

When you've created a document and sent it out to your colleagues for editing, you'll probably need to review the tracked changes and decide which to keep and which to jettison.

How to save documents as .doc

By default, Word save all documents in the newest format (*.docx), but you can change the default format to doc or anything else.

Superimposing characters

You can use superimposing characters for easy and fast entering text without using Equation.

Flow text from one text box to another

In some document layouts (e.g., magazines), you may need to run a series of text boxes that contain a sequence of text. Word lets you flow text from one text box to another: When the first text box is full, Word automatically moves to the next text box and fills it. If you add or delete text in a text box, Word adjusts the text in the subsequent text boxes accordingly.

Saving Documents

Saving your document in the same location with the same name is easy.

Opening Documents

The Open dialog box,is your key to finding and retrieving Word documents.

Show or Hide Enhanced ScreenTips

By default, Word shows document tooltips (or screentips) when you hover on a button, but this option can be turned off.

Modifying subdocuments

You can modify subdocuments, but with features. This tip contains some of these features. You can modify subdocuments using the same tools that you have used to create a master document and subdocuments. This tip describes how to use those tools to modify subdocuments. How to create a master document, see The Master Document View, and Creating subdocuments for information about creating subdocuments.

Creating subdocuments

Every master document consists of a normal document stuff and links to other documents. Those links can be used to pull in the information from the documents to which the master documented is linked.

The Master Document View

Word master document enables you to: cross-reference items among several documents; create indexes, tables of contents, and lists that span several documents; easily assign consistent page numbering, headers, and other formatting across multiple documents; etc.
A book is ideally suited to the master document feature. Each chapter can be a subdocument, and the elements common to the entire book can be contained in the master document itself.