PowerPoint 2016 2010 2007

How to customize your local PowerPoint for better productivity

PowerPoint is rarely used by the average Microsoft Office user, but those who use it frequently might find these simple time-saving tips helpful.

Shortcut keys for creating, opening files and slides

You can use the following Shortcut keys or Hotkeys:

How to turn off Start screen

When you first start most of the Office 2013 applications, you'll see a new feature called the Start screen.

Collapse the Ribbon to get more space on screen

When you need as much space as possible on screen to view a document, you can collapse (or minimize) the Ribbon and then restore it very simple.

Adding Commands to the Quick Access Toolbar

You can add some commands to the Quick Access Toolbar, for example, Subscript and Superscript.

Creating Your Own Menu

Creating custom menus in PowerPoint is a funny feature you can use to create groups of the options that you use most often, and then plug them into the menu you name and use yourself.

Displaying the Date, Number, and Footer on Slides

Even though the placeholders for Date, Number, and Footer might appear in the slide master, they do not appear on the actual slides in the presentation unless you enable them.

Working with Multiple Presentations

You usually work with only one presentation at a given time. But occasionally you may need to open two or more presentations at once. E.g., to copy text or slides from one presentation to another.

Changing the autosaving path

By default, all files in PowerPoint (and all of the Office applications) are saved to Documents folder or library (or My Documents under Windows XP) for the current user.
Each user has his or her own version of this folder, so that each person's documents are kept separate depending on who is logged in to the PC.

Protect presentation

If a presentation contains sensitive or confidential data, you can encrypt the file and protect it with a password.
Encryption is a type of "scrambling" done to the file so that nobody can see it, either from within PowerPoint or with any other type of file-browsing utility.